Conveyancing Solicitors in Suffolk

If you are looking for a conveyancing solicitor in Suffolk we can help you. Our conveyancing solicitors offer a convenient, efficient, and friendly conveyancing service to clients in Suffolk, throughout East Anglia and all over England, Wales and beyond.

Whether you are buying a detached house in Suffolk, selling a terraced house in Ipswich, downsizing to a bungalow in Lowestoft, or buying to let in Bury St Edmunds, we can help you with your conveyancing.

Why should you use Bird and Co Solicitors for your conveyancing in Suffolk?

We offer a friendly, modern and efficient service. If you want to deal with experienced conveyancing lawyers who are friendly and approachable, our team can help you.

You will have a direct line straight through to your legal team, incuding individual email addresses. You can guarantee that your query will reach the right people, whether you want to ask about search fees, drainage and water fees or anything else.

"The team always provided me with clear, pragmatic and commercially viable advice with efficient and focused communication."

We're a Conveyancing Quality Scheme accredited firm providing conveyancing to clients in Suffolk. This is a guarantee that our processes and procedures have been assessed to the highest standards and is a mark of the excellence of our service. The Conveyancing Quality Scheme is run by the Law Society, which is the body that represents solicitors throughout England and Wales.

We are on the panel for most major lenders, and many smaller ones too. Whether you want to use your local Building Society in Suffolk or one of the larger corporates, chances are we have you covered.

In short, when you use Bird & Co’s conveyancing solicitors in Suffolk, you get an excellent conveyancing service at an affordable price.

Why you don't need a conveyancer based in Suffolk

In the old days you used your local solicitor. You would visit their office in the centre of Ipswich, or wherever else you lived, and all documents would be hand-produced and posted or delivered by hand.

That service came at a price and the truth is, it is no longer needed. With modern technology such as scanning, emailing and even Skype or Facetime video calls, there is no need to use your local solicitor. Your conveyancer can be based anywhere and still provide a great service - even if he or she is in an office many miles away in a different part of Suffolk or somewhere outside of Suffolk.

We have successfully dealt with thousands of conveyancing transactions all over the country, even with clients from the other side of the world. It is not unknown for us to talk to clients outside the UK using Skype – once we even had clients in Thailand talking to us through an interpreter in New Zealand!

There will be no need for you to visit our offices or hand deliver documents. You need never leave Suffolk - our conveyancers will talk you through the process via phone and email, and everything works just as smoothly as it would if we were just down the road.

Online Conveyancing in Suffolk

There isn't really any such thing as online conveyancing. Clients come to us for conveyancing in Suffolk, including Ipswich, Bury St Edmunds and all sorts of other places, having first found us via our website.

After that, the relationship between you and your conveyancer is the same as any other. We have the same professional obligations towards you, and deal with your conveyancing file in the same way.

It might feel like online conveyancing because you can talk to us through email on your computer, but really it is proper conveyancing.

Search Fees in Suffolk

Every local authority is different. We use an excellent, trusted national search provider, which means we can provide searches to clients in Suffolk and all over the country, knowing that we will get a product we're happy with and which we know is properly insured and protects your interests.

What is the process to instruct us for your conveyancing?

First, fill in our conveyancing quote form for conveyancing in Suffolk. You can find the links at the top of this page.

Our conveyancing support team will then guide you through the initial stages and, once your conveyancing file is opened, your Suffolk conveyancing solicitor and their small team will deal with the legal side of the conveyancing transaction. You'll be given direct contact details for your conveyancing lawyers and they'll keep in touch with you every step of the way.

Whether you're moving to Suffolk or away from Suffolk to somewhere else, our conveyancing team can help you do so with the minimum of fuss and inconvenience.

Fees for conveyancing in Suffolk

Our fees are transparent and, so long as the situation does not change (for example so long as your property doesn't turn out to be leasehold when we thought it was freehold), the fee we quote is the fee you will be charged.

We don't add extras on for things like photocopying or postage. Those are our overheads and we don't pass them on to you.

All our conveyancing fees are dependent on the nature and value of the transaction, so we naturally charge a bit more for more complicated and high value work. However, the fee charged will be the same for a customer in Newcastle as it would be for someone in London, or indeed in Suffolk.

There are some aspects of our conveyancing fees we can't change. Fees charged by other bodies such as HM Land Registry, or by HMRC for Stamp Duty Land

Tax (SDLT), are out of our control.

Introduction to Suffolk

Suffolk is a county in East Anglia, bordering the counties of Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. According to estimates for mid-2016, Suffolk has a population of approximately 745,300. Suffolk contains several major towns, including Ipswich (the county town), Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Haverhill, Felixstowe and Newmarket.

Like much of East Anglia, Suffolk is well-known for its low-lying, relatively flat terrain with few hills. Notable local geographic features include the Broads, a network of rivers and lakes across Suffolk and neighbouring Norfolk, and the Suffolk Coast and Heaths, which are an officially designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Suffolk is home to the University of Suffolk, which has been accepting students since 2007. It was previously known as University Campus Suffolk, having been formed originally as in collaboration between University of Essex and the University of East Anglia. However, the university has been fully independent since 2016.

Ipswich

Ipswich is the county town of Suffolk and the most populous town in the country with an estimated population of 133,384, according to the 2011 census. The town itself is situated on the River Orwell, and nearby towns include Felixstowe, Woodbridge, Needham Market and Stowmarket.

Ipswich's economy used to mainly revolve around agriculture and firms such as Ransomes, Sims & Jefferies Ltd, one of the country's most famous agricultural manufacturers, used to be present in the town. There was, until 2001, a major sugar beet factory in the town as well. Other industries in the area include the service sector, which has been dominated in the past by firms such as BT. Others include AXA, Churchill, LV and Willis.

Cultural attractions in the town include Ipswich Museum and the Ipswich Transport Museum, both of which are popular amongst tourists and residents. There is also the New Wolsey Theatre, a 400-seat theatre located on Civic Drive.

Ipswich Arts Festival, also known as 'Ip-art', has occurred annually since 2003. It hosts visual arts, performing arts, literature, film and music events. There is also an annual jazz festival that started in 2015.

The town has a number of sporting venues, with Portman Road being the best-known, as the home of Ipswich Town Football Club. The ground underwent significant redevelopment in the early 2000s and now has a capacity of 30,311. It is also used to host music concerts and other events. Ipswich is also home to a number of non-league clubs, a speedway team, a gymnastics centre, and multiple swimming clubs.

In terms of transport, Ipswich is close to the A14 and A12 roads, which provides access to nearby and long distance areas. The town is also on the Great Eastern Main Line from London to Norwich and the East Suffolk Line to Lowestoft as well as the Felixstowe Branch Line. There are frequent services to areas such as London Liverpool Street and Norwich. The town is also only 40 minutes from Stansted Airport.

Lowestoft

Lowestoft is a town in the north-east of Suffolk, located on the North Sea coast and on the edge of the Broads. It is the most easterly settlement in the UK with a population of 71,010 according to the 2011 census.

Lowestoft is a port town with strong ties to the fishing industry and the oil and gas industry, as well as being a traditional seaside resort. The town benefits from wide, sandy Blue Flag beaches and two piers, as well as a number of other popular tourist attractions.

The town is divided in two by Lake Lothing, which forms Lowestoft Harbour, as well as providing access to the River Waveney and the Broads. Lowestoft is one of the UK’s driest and most temperate areas, with relatively low average rainfall throughout the year and a minimum average temperature in winter of 2°C.

Major local employers include Birds Eye frozen food, various oil and gas companies and a growing number of renewable energy companies.

Lowestoft train station provides services to Ipswich and Norwich, from where connections are available to the rest of the UK. The A12 from London to Great Yarmouth passes through the centre of Lowestoft, while the A146 links the town to Beccles and Norwich.

Bury St Edmunds

Bury St Edmunds is a market town situated in West Suffolk with a population of around 42,000. It is widely known for its breweries, notably Greene King (one of the UK's leading brands), and for its British Sugar Processing plant, where Silver Spoon sugar is produced.

The town’s history begins in Saxon times, when the town was known as Beodericsworth. More recent history includes the establishment of the Gibraltar Barracks in 1878, cementing its military presence. The town’s history in chalk-workings has left a legacy of extensive tunnels beneath various parts of the town.

A lot of the town's economy revolves around tourism. In the centre lies the remains of the Bury St Edmunds Abbey, which a popular attraction. The listed abbey gate is also a common tourist destination, as is the Bury St Edmunds Cathedral, of which the eastern end was extended in the 1960s.

The Moyse's Hall Museum is one of the oldest domestic buildings in East Anglia. It has a collection of fine art, as well as information on local history revolving around witchcraft. The town also hosts an annual festival in May, including concerts, plays, dancing, lecturers and fireworks, making it exceptionally popular amongst tourists.

In terms of transport, Bury St Edmunds railway station serves the town,  operated by Abellio Greater Anglia. This provides frequent services to areas such as Peterborough and Ely, while onward connections from Cambridge provide services to London Stations.

Haverhill

Haverill is a town in the south-west of Suffolk, near the borders of Cambridgeshire and Essex. The town is 47 miles north-east of London, with a population of 27,041 at the 2011 census.

The town is home to a number of manufacturing businesses and scientific companies, as well as transport and construction firms, amongst other industries. The town has grown significantly over the past few decades and is popular with London commuters.

Haverhill is also well located for London Stansted Airport and the Cambridge City Airport, making it convenient for both international and domestic flights.

Felixstowe

Felixstowe is a seaside town in south-east Suffolk with a population of 23,689 at the time of the 2011 census. A popular tourist destination, Felixstowe also includes the Port of Felixstowe, which is the UK’s largest container port.

Popular tourist attractions include a pier, which is home to an amusement arcade, The Seafront Gardens, Landguard Nature Reserve, Landguard Fort and Felixstowe Museum. The town has a recently refurbished sandy beach and a stony beach with a Victorian promenade.  

Felixstowe is connected to Ipswich by the Felixstowe railway station and by road to the rest of Suffolk, London and the surrounding area.

Newmarket

Newmarket is a town in west Suffolk, 65 miles north of London, with a population of 20,384 at the 2011 census. It is generally best known for being the birthplace and global home of thoroughbred horse racing and is home to the majority of Britain’s key horseracing organisations.

Newmarket is the largest racehorse training centre in Britain with over fifty horse training stables, two large racetracks and one of the largest horse training grounds in the world. The town is home to more than 3,500 racehorses and as many as one in three local jobs are related to the industry.

Newmarket railway station connects the town to Cambridge, Bury St Edmunds and Ipswich. The town is connected to London Kings Cross station via Cambridge, with the journey typically taking approximately 1 hour and 20 minutes.

 

Home values in Suffolk

Suffolk Conveyancing

Online Conveyancing in Suffolk

There isn't really any such thing as online conveyancing. Clients come to us for conveyancing in Suffolk, Ipswich, Bury St Edmunds and all sorts of other places, having first found us via our website.

After that, the relationship between you and your conveyancer is the same as any other. We have the same professional obligations towards you, and deal with your conveyancing file in the same way.

It might feel like online conveyancing because you can talk to us through email on your computer, but really it is proper conveyancing.

Search Fees in Suffolk

Every local authority is different. We use an excellent, trusted national search provider, which means we can provide searches to clients in Suffolkand all over the country, knowing that we will get a product we're happy with and which we know is properly insured and protects your interests.

What is the process to instruct us for your conveyancing?

First, fill in our conveyancing quote form for conveyancing in Suffolk. You can find the links at the top of this page.

Our helpful conveyancing support team will then guide you through the initial stages, and once your conveyancing file is opened your Suffolk conveyancing solicitor and their small team will deal with the legal side of the conveyancing transaction. You'll be given direct contact details for your conveyancing lawyers and they'll keep in touch with you every step of the way.

Whether you're moving to Suffolk or away from Suffolk to somewhere else, our conveyancing team can help you do so with the minimum of fuss and inconvenience.

Fees for conveyancing in Suffolk

Our fees are transparent and, so long as the situation does not change (for example so long as your property doesn't turn out to be leasehold when we thought it was freehold) the fee we quote is the fee you will be charged.

We don't add extras on for things like photocopying, postage, or the like. Those are our overheads and we don't pass them on to you.

All our conveyancing fees are dependent on the nature and value of the transaction, so we naturally charge a bit more for more complicated and high value work. However, the fee charged will be the same for a customer in Newcastle as it would be for someone in London, or indeed in Suffolk.

There are some aspects of our conveyancing fees which we can't change. Fees charged by other bodies such as HM Land Registry, or by HMRC for Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) are out of our control.

Introduction to Suffolk

Suffolk is a county in East Anglia, bordering counties such as Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. As of mid-2014, the population of the district is 730,100, and much of this population can be found in the larger towns such as Ipswich, Lowestoft and Bury St Edmunds. That said, there are also a number of other notable settlements which are also significant in their own right.

Ipswich is the county town of Suffolk, southern England. It is a large town, with borough status and a population of 133,384. The town itself is situated on the River Orwell, and nearby towns include Felixstowe, Woodbridge, Needham Market and Stowmarket.

Ipswich's economy used to mainly revolve around agriculture, and firms such as Ransomes, Sims & Jefferies Ltd, one of the country's most famous agricultural manufacturers, used to be present in the town. There was, until 2001, a major sugar beet factory in the town as well.

Other industries in the area include the service sector, which has been dominated in the past by firms such as BT. Others include AXA, Churchill, LV and Willis.

Cultural attractions in the town include Ipswich Museum and the Ipswich Transport Museum which are both popular amongst tourists and residents. There is also the New Wolsey Theatre- a 400 seat theatre located on Civic Drive.

Ipswich Arts Festival, also known as 'Ip-art', has occurred annually since 2003, and often hosts visual arts, performing arts, literature, film and music events. There is also an annual jazz festival which started in 2015.

Some of the town's sporting venues can also be classed as 'Cultural Attractions'. Portman Road is the most obvious example of this. It is the home of Ipswich Town Football Club, who currently play in the Championship. The ground has a capacity of 30,311 and can therefore accommodate large amounts of home and away fans.

There are also a number of non-league clubs, a speedway team, a gymnastics centre, and multiple swimming clubs.

In terms of transport, Ipswich is close to the A14 and A12 roads, which provides access to nearby and long distance areas. The town is also on the Great Eastern Main Line from London to Norwich and the East Suffolk Line to Lowestoft as well as the Felixstowe Branch Line. There are frequent services to areas such as London Liverpool Street and Norwich.

The town is also only 40 minutes from Stansted Airport.

Bury St Edmunds is a market town situated in West Suffolk with a population of around 42,000.

It is widely known for its breweries, notably Greene King (one of the UK's leading brands), and for its British Sugar Processing plant, where Silver Spoon sugar is produced.

The towns history begins in Saxon times, when the town was known as Beodericsworth. More recent history includes the establishment of the Gibraltar Barracks in 1878, cementing its military presence. The towns history in chalk-workings is also a common explanation for its extensive tunnel systems.

Alot of the town's economy revolves around tourism. In the centre lies the remains of the Bury St Edmunds Abbey, which is commonly visited. The listed abbey gate is also a common tourist destination, as is the Bury St Edmunds Cathedral, of which the eastern end was extended in the 1960s.

The Moyse's Hall Museum is one of the oldest domestic building in East Anglia. It has a collection of fine art, as well as local history revolving Witchcraft.
The town also hosts an annual festival in May, including concerts, plays, dancing, lecturers and fireworks, making it exceptionally popular amongst tourists.

In terms of transport, Bury St Edmunds railway station serves the town, and is operated by Abellio Greater Anglia, and provides frequent services to areas such as Peterborough and Ely. Onward connections from Cambridge provide services to London Stations.