Conveyancing Solicitors in Coventry

If you are looking for a conveyancing solicitor in Coventry we can help you. Our conveyancing solicitors offer a convenient, efficient, and friendly conveyancing service to clients in Coventry , throughout Warwickshire and all over England, Wales and beyond.

If you are buying a detached house in Coventry , selling a terraced house in Earlsdon, downsizing to a bungalow in Cheylesmore, or buying to let in Finham, we can help you with your conveyancing.

Why should you use Bird and Co Solicitors for your conveyancing in Coventry?

We offer a friendly, modern and efficient service. If you want to deal with proper lawyers who are friendly and approachable, our team can help you.

You will have a direct line straight through to your legal team, and direct email addresses. You can guarantee that your query will reach the right people, whether you want to ask about search fees in Coventry , drainage and water fees in Warwickshire or something else.

"The team always provided me with clear, pragmatic and commercially viable advice with efficient and focused communication."

We're a Conveyancing Quality Scheme accredited firm providing conveyancing to clients in Coventry . This is a guarantee that our processes and procedures have been approved, that we operate to a certain standard, and is a mark of the excellence of our service approved by the Law Society, the body which represents solicitors throughout England and Wales.

We are on the panel for most major lenders, and many smaller ones too. Whether you want to use your local Building Society in Warwickshire or one of the larger corporates, chances are we have you covered.

In short, you get an excellent conveyancing service at an affordable price. You don't have the risk of going to the cheapest providers, most of whom aren't solicitors; instead you get a great service from proper lawyers.

Why don't you need a conveyancer based in Coventry ?

In the old days you used your local solicitor. You would visit their office in the centre of Coventry , and all documents would be hand-produced and posted or delivered by hand.

That service came at a price, but the truth is that it is no longer needed. With modern technology such as scanning, emailing and even Skype or Facetime video calls there is no need to use your local solicitor. Your conveyancer can be based anywhere and still provide a great service - even if he or she is in an office many miles away from Coventry or perhaps not even in Warwickshire.

We have successfully dealt with thousands of conveyancing transactions all over the country, even with clients from the other side of the world. It is not unknown for us to talk to clients outside the UK using Skype, and once we had clients in Thailand talking to us through an interpreter in New Zealand!

There will be no need for you to visit our offices or hand deliver documents. You need never leave Coventry - our conveyancers will talk you through the process via phone and email, and everything works just as smoothly as it would if we were just down the road.

 

Home values in Coventry

Coventry Conveyancing

Online Conveyancing in Coventry

There isn't really any such thing as online conveyancing. Clients come to us for conveyancing in Coventry , Earlsdon, Finham and all sorts of other places, having first found us via our website.

After that, the relationship between you and your conveyancer is the same as any other. We have the same professional obligations towards you, and deal with your conveyancing file in the same way.

It might feel like online conveyancing because you can talk to us through email on your computer, but really it is proper conveyancing.

Search Fees in Coventry

Every local authority is different. We use an excellent, trusted national search provider, which means we can provide searches to clients in Coventry and all over the country, knowing that we will get a product we're happy with and which we know is properly insured and protects your interests.

What is the process to instruct us for your conveyancing?

First, fill in our conveyancing quote form for conveyancing in Coventry . You can find the links at the top of this page.

Our helpful conveyancing support team will then guide you through the initial stages, and once your conveyancing file is opened your Coventry conveyancing solicitor and their small team will deal with the legal side of the conveyancing transaction. You'll be given direct contact details for your conveyancing lawyers and they'll keep in touch with you every step of the way.

Whether you're moving to Coventry or away from Coventry to somewhere else, our conveyancing team can help you do so with the minimum of fuss and inconvenience.

Fees for conveyancing in Coventry

Our fees are transparent and, so long as the situation does not change (for example so long as your property doesn't turn out to be leasehold when we thought it was freehold) the fee we quote is the fee you will be charged.

We don't add extras on for things like photocopying, postage, or the like. Those are our overheads and we don't pass them on to you.

All our conveyancing fees are dependent on the nature and value of the transaction, so we naturally charge a bit more for more complicated and high value work. However, the fee charged will be the same for a customer in Newcastle as it would be for someone in London, or indeed in Coventry .

There are some aspects of our conveyancing fees which we can't change. Fees charged by other bodies such as HM Land Registry, or by HMRC for Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) are out of our control.

Introduction to Coventry

Coventry is a city located in Warwickshire, in the West Midlands. It is the tenth largest city in England and the 12th largest in the UK, with a population of 337,428. It is located 19 miles south east of Birmingham, 26 miles south west of Leicester, 14 miles west of Rugby and 10 miles north of Royal Leamington Spa and Warwick.

Coventry is exceptionally well connected to the motorway network with the M69 and M6 junction being five miles north of the city centre. The M69 runs to Leicester and the M1 north is useful for destinations in the East Midlands, Yorkshire and to the North East. The M6 running West connects to Birmingham, the M42 and the North West of England, whilst the M6 heading east connects to the M1 South and is the route to London.

Coventry’s train station is located just outside the inner ring road, near junction 6, and is on the Birmingham loop of the West Coast Main Line. A train to London takes one hour and seven minutes and it takes just 22 minutes by train to Birmingham. The station was originally opened in 1838, and had a significant redevelopment in the 1960’s with extra platforms being created, and the redesign was rewarded with a Grade II listed building status in 1995. Designs and plans are being put in place for a £80m+ redevelopment of the station to commence in 2019. Coventry is experiencing exceptional growth in rail passengers and the development will include a new multi-storey carpark, a new entrance facing Warwick Road, and a new platform. The new platform which will be ready in 2021 and will facilitate extra services to Nuneaton, Kenilworth and Leamington, as well as extra services for events at the Ricoh arena.

Prior to WW2, Coventry had been famous for watch and clock manufacture before becoming heavily involved in bicycle manufacture. This was partly down to Coventry resident James Starley's invention of the Rover Safety Bicycle, a pioneering design which was significantly safer than the Penny Farthing. This industry later transformed into making Coventry central to the British Motor industry, with the headquarters of firms such as Jaguar being in Coventry. Jaguar’s global headquarters is based in Whitley just south of the city, with visitors often using the park and ride scheme at Tollbar End on Rowley Road. Coventry is recognised as the birth place of the British motor industry, and stems from 1896 when HJ Lawson established Daimler Motors in an old Coventry cotton mill. Daimler was eventually sold to Jaguar Cars in the 1960s.

Coventry was very badly damaged by bomb damage in WW2 – particularly as a result of a devastating Luftwaffe air raid on 14 November 1940 known as the Coventry Blitz, which killed over 800 people, damaged three quarters of the industrial buildings and destroyed the historic centre of Coventry.

War Memorial Park located just south of the city is 48 hectares of parkland, first designated as a park in the 1920s. The park is host to numerous events during the year including the Godiva Festival, Donkey Derby, a Caribbean Festival and Vaisakhi Mela.

The park has undergone recent refurbishment and is home to a 90 feet high stone war memorial, tennis courts, visitors centre, café pavillion, children’s play area and an aviary. Every Saturday the park welcomes several hundred joggers for the weekly 5km Park Run.

The Portland stone war memorial was built by John Gray, once a resident of Coombe Abbey, who was a master builder who built housing estates at the suburbs of Wyken and Stoke and built the Courtaulds Works at Foleshill.

Coombe Abbey, to the west of Coventry, is now a popular luxury hotel, but was once a 12th century abbey and, after Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries, was home to Queen Elizabeth I for a short period. The hotel is located next to the Coombe Country Park with 500 acres of parkland, formal gardens and a lake. The park is accessed via the Coventry Eastern Bypass and is on the road between Binley and Brinklow.

Coventry’s best-known landmark is the Grade I listed St. Michaels Cathedral. The old cathedral is largely in ruins having been badly damaged in the Second World War with only the outer walls and spire surviving. The spire forms one of three spires – which have dominated the Coventry skyline since the 14th Century – with the others being the church spire of Holy Trinity Church and the spire of Christ Church. The new St Michaels Cathedral is a Grade I listed modernist building designed by Sir Basil Spence. Finished in 1962, it was built alongside the ruins and the spire of the old cathedral.

There is also the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum which is one of the largest cultural sites in Coventry, as well as the Transport Museum, which does a good job of reflecting back on the city's history in the motor industry.  The Herbert Art Gallery and Museum celebrates Coventry’s culture, history and arts through both permanent galleries and visiting exhibitions. The Herbert, as it is often referred to, is a ten to fifteen-minute walk from the train station and is found at Jordan Well, in the city centre, by following the brown tourist signs.

The Coventry Transport Museum is located at Millennium Place on Hales Street in the city centre and is home to the world’s two fastest cars, as well as a unique 4D simulator where visitors can experience travelling through the sound barrier. The museum underwent a significant renovation investment project in 2014 which has helped showcase their star cars and runs a comprehensive visitor and events programme. The museum is free to enter, boasts the best collection of British cars and motorcycles in the country, and has an award-winning coffee shop and a gift shop.

Coventry has two universities; Coventry University, which is located within the city itself, and the University of Warwick which is only 3.5 miles out of the city, the latter of which is featured in the Russell Group, and has never been rated outside the top ten universities in terms of teaching excellence and research. There are also three further education colleges; City College Coventry, Henley College Coventry and North Warwickshire and Hinkley College plus an array of both primary and secondary schools.

University Hospital Coventry is located outside of the city entre to the east of the city and is best approached by leaving the city centre on the A4600 /Antsy Road heading towards the M69/M6 motorway junction.

Other visitors to Coventry may arrive to attend a football match at the Ricoh Arena, the 32,500-capacity stadium where Coventry City Football Club play. The football club was formed in 1883 and had enjoyed 34 consecutive seasons in the top flight of English football before 2001 when they were relegated. The team are currently playing in League Two and their biggest accolade as a club is probably winning the FA Cup in 1987. Numerous famous players have played at the club but include crowd favourites, Craig Bellamy, Robbie Keane, Steve Ogrizovic, Dion Dublin and Cyrille Regis.

The Ricoh Arena is three miles north of the city centre on the A444, and just a mile from junction 3 of the M6. Just outside the arena, is a large memorial garden and a bronze statue of famous football player, pundit and broadcaster Jimmy Hill, who spent a number of years at Coventry City as Player, Manager and Chairman in the 1960s and 1970s.

As of the 21st December 2014, the Rugby Union Aviva Premiership Club Wasps also play at the Ricoh Arena, having relocated to the city from London after purchasing shares in the Company which owns the Ricoh Arena.

Aside from sporting heros, Coventry has had its fair share of famous people, including, Lady Godiva, Philip Larkin (poet), Frank Whittle (jet pioneer), Lee Childs (author), Pete Waterman (record producer) and actors Nigel Hawthorne and Clive Owen.

A statue of Lady Godiva can be found on Broadgate in Coventry. Lady Godiva was a famous anglo-saxon noblewoman, who had lived in Coventry in the 11th century, and is forever immortalised in John Colliers pre-raphaelite painting. Lady Godiva is famous for riding on horseback naked through the streets of Coventry in protest against her husband’s imposition of high taxes on his tenants.

To the south of Coventry is Finham, a residential suburb of Coventry where in recent years there has been several proposals for new housing developments, including most recently in Kings Hill and Westwood Heath. To the north of Coventry is the housing suburbs of Wyken, Edgwick, Walsgrave and Holbrooks.

Outside of the immediate surroundings of the Coventry city, there are numerous other tourist attractions within a ten-mile radius, including Kenilworth Castle, the National Motorcycle Museum, Coventry Canal Basin, Lunt Roman Fort, Bagots Castle, and Stoneleigh Abbey which has links to Jane Austen.